Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information

Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Humanity, during a time of crisis, splits into moral pieces. Those who care about others will, like you said, show their best…Then there is the other side, the selfish, there will be those that will walk by and leave someone in need or take from someone to benefit themselves. Survival instincts makes us think isolation is the safest way, but that is only short term, humans are a social creature and we work better and create things better in social groups. Humanity, as a whole, will overcome the SHTF event by coming together and working towards a common problem. I think out of initial fear most will keep to themselves but eventually they will need to overcome their fears and regroup to bring back what was lost.

There are two subjects that the mainstream media seems specifically determined to avoid discussing these days when it comes to the economy – the first is the problem of falling global demand for goods and services; they absolutely refuse to acknowledge the fact that demand is going stagnant and will conjure all kinds of rationalizations to distract from the issue. The other subject is the debt bubble, the corporate debt bubble in particular.
store was a good place until I had my 2nd incident. bought 3 dozen minnows all went belly up 20 min ...after leaving the store the 2nd I bought 4 dozen more paid for them then before I left the store had 2 dozen of those dead! was told no refund or replacement and I never left the store. I am out 7 dozen minnows ($14) quick to take my money but would replace the 2 dozen that were dead before i even left the store. See More
The Deluxe Car Emergency Kit from GetReadyNow comes in a clear, heavy-duty dry bag to keep supplies from getting wet and to allow for easy visibility. It fits conveniently under the seat and contains an LED headlamp with batteries, 4 Millennium food bars, 8 water pouches, LED glow sticks, waste disposal bags, Mylar blankets, ponchos, a 46-piece first aid kit, and much more!
Here’s my list of Survival and Collapse medical supplies with natural remedies included. We include natural remedies for first use or back up to save on items that won’t be produced in an austere setting. Dr.Bones and I spend a lot of time and energy researching “back-up” plans for traditional medicine. We want you to have the ability to provide medical help in a disaster scenario, and for that, you’ll need conventional medical supplies and some knowledge on what natural remedies are useful for certain situations. Below is a very ambitious list of things you should consider:

A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.

In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.
What is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a portable emergency kit that should last you for 72-hours. They’re also known as 72-hour kits, grab bags or Go Bags. The idea behind the bag is to be prepared in need of an evacuation. If your family is mandatorily, or voluntarily evacuating from your home, this kit would include all the things you’d need to survive for at least three days. So, telling you what to pack is a little tricky. It really depends on your personal needs, your surroundings and the type of emergency you might face. However, in the next few sections we’ll address the basics that should not be missed when packing a bug out bag.
In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.
If your primary use would be in the event of a natural disaster, for example, you’ll need a kit that contains at least 72 hours of supplies for every member of your family. Some people also keep a gas mask in their 72 hour kit in the event of a chemical attack. But if you’re concerned about defending yourself against a horde of flesh-hungry humanoids, the Gerber Zombie Apocalypse Kit is right up your alley.

On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
The term "survival kit" may also refer to the larger, portable survival kits prepared by survivalists, called "bug-out bags" (BOBs), "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERKs) or "get out of Dodge" (GOOD) kits, which are packed into backpacks, or even duffel bags. These kits are designed specifically to be more easily carried by the individual in case alternate forms of transportation are unavailable or impossible to use.
Tools may include cutting tools such as saws, axes and hatchets; mechanical advantage aids such as a pry bar or wrecking bar, ropes, pulleys, or a 'come-a-long" hand-operated winch; construction tools such as pliers, chisels, a hammer, screwdrivers, a hand-operated twist drill, vise grip pliers, glue, nails, nuts, bolts, and screws; mechanical repair tools such as an arc welder, an oxy-acetylene torch, a propane torch with a spark lighter, a solder iron and flux, wrench set, a nut driver, a tap and die set, a socket set, and a fire extinguisher. As well, some survivalists bring barterable items such as fishing line, liquid soap, insect repellent, light bulbs, can openers, extra fuels, motor oil, and ammunition.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
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