Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.
Shawn from Folkway Lodge mentioned Dave Canterbury talks about the 5 C (sometimes the 10 C’s) of preparedness. Shawn wrote: I like the 5 C’s: Cutting Tool (knife, Hatchet) Cordage (Bank Line, Paracord, Hemp Rope) Cover (Tent, Tarp, Poncho) Combustion (Fire Steel, Ferro Rod, Flint and Steel, Magnifying Glass) Container (Steel Bowl, Pot, Or Single Wall Water Bottle)
make a map of areas covered and items for future use when in need. the list and map can be passed to others in your group that would save time vertically all office buildings and factories must have emer. lighting to allow exit when the power fails or fire blocks vision these have rechargeable batteries. while these are not the best type they will provide lighting and are easily recharged. circuit boards that are in them will provide a way to recharge the batteries. also they have candy machines that could be emptied quickly things like toilet paper is usual stored in adequate supplies. some places provide sanitary supplies for women hilos could provide batteries as well. places large enough to service their cars and trucks would have oil and fuel. this is where the list will come in handy so others can find it easily.
Humanity, during a time of crisis, splits into moral pieces. Those who care about others will, like you said, show their best…Then there is the other side, the selfish, there will be those that will walk by and leave someone in need or take from someone to benefit themselves. Survival instincts makes us think isolation is the safest way, but that is only short term, humans are a social creature and we work better and create things better in social groups. Humanity, as a whole, will overcome the SHTF event by coming together and working towards a common problem. I think out of initial fear most will keep to themselves but eventually they will need to overcome their fears and regroup to bring back what was lost.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices. 
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