First thing he said is lose luxuries. Generators are luxuries but they run out of fuel. You will spend more time looking for fuel and spare parts or rumors of fuel and spare parts. In addition lights and noise attract unwanted attention. Said Toilet paper will be worth its weight in GOLD. Try wiping your butt with some leaves for a few months. Lastly there are several things I never see on Bug Out/In lists is any type of Pest or Rodent Control. Yes rodents ants spiders etc, will be a problem.
2. Cars – You’ll want to check the glove box, under the seats, and in the trunk for snacks, tools, and other useful items. Parts of the car itself might prove useful, too. The mirrors could be used for signaling, the wiring for cordage, the upholstery for bedding and insulation, the battery for power (if someone in your group is mechanically inclined), and of course the engine parts if you need them for your own vehicle.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
Tools may include cutting tools such as saws, axes and hatchets; mechanical advantage aids such as a pry bar or wrecking bar, ropes, pulleys, or a 'come-a-long" hand-operated winch; construction tools such as pliers, chisels, a hammer, screwdrivers, a hand-operated twist drill, vise grip pliers, glue, nails, nuts, bolts, and screws; mechanical repair tools such as an arc welder, an oxy-acetylene torch, a propane torch with a spark lighter, a solder iron and flux, wrench set, a nut driver, a tap and die set, a socket set, and a fire extinguisher. As well, some survivalists bring barterable items such as fishing line, liquid soap, insect repellent, light bulbs, can openers, extra fuels, motor oil, and ammunition.
Freshwater may get contaminated. If it is, it requires purifying or desalinating water to satisfy hydration needs. Humans can survive only a few days without fresh water. When SHTF, your water tap will dry up fast. You need to find a new solution. There is a variety of water filtration gear available online that you can reuse hundreds or even thousands of times. It is highly recommended that your survival kit includes several backups.
The Bighorn First Aid Kit contains sterile bandage materials, care for wounds, blisters, and burns, a CPR face shield, fracture and sprain care, essentials tools, common medications, and a “Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine.” It is designed to help you provide hospital-quality care for up to seven people on trips lasting up to a week in length.
A supply of nonperishable food and water are a core necessity for every survival kit. Amazon.com offers several varieties of survival kits with emergency food for different situations. For the boat, car, or RV, high caloric density food bars are a compact and affordable way to stay safe. You’ll also find dehydrated meals in large quantities prepackaged compact bins for convenient storage. Waterproof survival kits are perfect for the basement, and contain up to three months of food for four adults.
Ever since this coronavirus outbreak first began, the mainstream media has been feeding us fake news over and over again.  Initially, we were repeatedly told that there was very little to be concerned about because it was very unlikely that human to human transmission was happening.  But now we know that this virus spreads very, very easily between people. 

Military Surplus. Army Surplus Store. Whatever you call it, the payoff is the same. Military Clothing, Boots & Shoes, Tactical Gear amazing one of a kind Military Collectibles, Surplus Gear from around the world and much, much more! Find that rare gem in Military Surplus Gear at Sportsman's Guide and all at jaw-dropping low prices. All perfect for your outdoor adventures.


Other small kits are wearable and built into everyday carry survival bracelets or belts. Most often these are paracord bracelets with tools woven inside. Several tools such as firestarter, buckles, whistles and compass are on the exterior of the gear and smaller tools are woven inside the jewelry or belt and only accessible by taking the bracelet apart.
Will have to totally disagree on this one. Cleaning up after using a menstrual cup is like birthing a kitten…speaking from personal experience. When it comes to my monthly when SHTF, I would much rather have a cleaner process overall. You are already having to dispose of blood/bloody items, why not just make it a more pleasurable experience. Also, water is probably going to be a precious commodity…don’t want to waste it washing out pads. Just IMHO.
Millions of Americans believe that in the not-too-distant future, America, and possibly the entire world, could be mired in a disaster of epic, Armageddon-sized proportions. Collectively, the apocalyptic event is known as when the SHTF. It’s the ultimate challenge to mankind’s survival. Whether it comes from social upheaval, natural, act-of-God disasters, economic failure, terrorism or war, concerned individuals are preparing for the worst.

On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7]
This survival kit comes in an ABS-plastic (1) waterproof case and includes Tinder-Quik fire starters, 150-pound-test braided nylon cord, and an emergency sewing and fishing kit. It also features military-spec stainless steel wire, a removable liquid-damped compass, a folding lock-blade knife, a rescue flash signal mirror capable of broadcasting your location up to 20 miles, and more
Water and food storage are particularly important in emergency preparedness. Do you have enough of each to last a year off the grid? If not, find the right supplies through our store. Our freeze-dried emergency food kits from Mountain House, Wise Foods, and other brands cover all meals of the day and require minimal preparation: Boil part of your emergency water, add it to the dehydrated or freeze-dried food, and wait a few minutes. Then, your meal is ready to eat as-is. Choose from several emergency food kits with enough items to last a year. For long-term emergency preparedness, many food storage kits last five to 25 years!

"Mini survival kits" or "Altoids tin" survival kits are small kits that contain a few basic survival tools. These kits often include a small compass, waterproof matches, minimum fishing tackle, large plastic bag, small candle, jigsaw blade, craft knife or scalpel blade, and/or a safety pin/s. Pre-packaged survival kits may also include instructions in survival techniques, including fire-starting or first aid methods. In addition, parachute cord can be wrapped around the tin. The parachute cord can be used for setting up an emergency shelter or snaring small animals. They are designed to fit within a container roughly the size of a mint tin.
This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.  Update (1150ET): Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the Director of the Center for the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), spoke on behalf of the CDC. During the press conference, she said that the US had identified 110 people who are under observation and being tested […]
We are farmers and have always planned ahead for needs. One, a farmer, must do so to successfully farm. Our greatest concerns are accidents and thievery. The uninvited could be armed now and especially during difficult times. There are those who would believe it is acceptable to steal from those who work very hard and very long hours. On the other hand, we are willing to help as many in need as we can, all the while, keeping in perspective the needs of our own families. Most of my neighbors feel the same. We help each other often and gladly.
The Deluxe Car Emergency Kit from GetReadyNow comes in a clear, heavy-duty dry bag to keep supplies from getting wet and to allow for easy visibility. It fits conveniently under the seat and contains an LED headlamp with batteries, 4 Millennium food bars, 8 water pouches, LED glow sticks, waste disposal bags, Mylar blankets, ponchos, a 46-piece first aid kit, and much more!
What is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a portable emergency kit that should last you for 72-hours. They’re also known as 72-hour kits, grab bags or Go Bags. The idea behind the bag is to be prepared in need of an evacuation. If your family is mandatorily, or voluntarily evacuating from your home, this kit would include all the things you’d need to survive for at least three days. So, telling you what to pack is a little tricky. It really depends on your personal needs, your surroundings and the type of emergency you might face. However, in the next few sections we’ll address the basics that should not be missed when packing a bug out bag.
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7]
×