Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
A survival kit is one of those items that you carry in your pack in case you need it, but hope you never have to open it, and if you find yourself in a situation where you have to open it, you better make dang sure it includes what you'll need. To help, here are a few considerations you'll want to take into account as you prepare your own emergency, survival, bug-out-bag, as well as some packages that have some of the vital components already included.
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.

Not knowing what a post-SHTF world will look like, most preppers believe that post collapse conditions will probably be absent of law and order as we know it. In this situation a prepared person hunkered down in their retreat space may become the target of looters, beggars, or worse – some sort of organized paramilitary group. Defense of your retreat space and survival supplies could become an unpleasant reality. Hungry wild animals may also pose a threat to your safety. Or you may find that you need to hunt for food or supplies.  
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A reliable, compact LED flashlight is indispensable for the purposes discussed here. Check out our favorite solution to this: the Hybeam Micro flashlight. The ideal way to supplement a regular flashlight is to get one that recharges by turning the attached handle. The light does not last as long as a regular flashlight. They are perfect, though, for non-emergency use to save battery power in the LED flashlights.
The Bighorn First Aid Kit contains sterile bandage materials, care for wounds, blisters, and burns, a CPR face shield, fracture and sprain care, essentials tools, common medications, and a “Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine.” It is designed to help you provide hospital-quality care for up to seven people on trips lasting up to a week in length.

First time customer and first time unboxing these widely advertised shtf boxes. Im very impressed with the quality and contents of my first shtf box. This is an instant addiction, cant wait for the March 19 box too arrive. I was blown away by the Uniden Scout Radios and the waterproof backpack. No im not an employee, im a dedicated customer at this point. Great product!!!!
Water and food storage are particularly important in emergency preparedness. Do you have enough of each to last a year off the grid? If not, find the right supplies through our store. Our freeze-dried emergency food kits from Mountain House, Wise Foods, and other brands cover all meals of the day and require minimal preparation: Boil part of your emergency water, add it to the dehydrated or freeze-dried food, and wait a few minutes. Then, your meal is ready to eat as-is. Choose from several emergency food kits with enough items to last a year. For long-term emergency preparedness, many food storage kits last five to 25 years!
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
Whether it’s a disaster in your area, or a personal accident, having a well-equipped survival kit is essential to your well-being. There is a wide variety of survival kits for all emergency disasters, including home survival kits, pet survival kits, and bug out bags. In any case, the resources, survival tips, and survival kit ideas offered at SurvivalKit.com far surpass any offered in the industry in terms of quality, versatility, and affordability. All that is found at SurvivalKit.com will prepare you today, so you can survive tomorrow!
Freshwater may get contaminated. If it is, it requires purifying or desalinating water to satisfy hydration needs. Humans can survive only a few days without fresh water. When SHTF, your water tap will dry up fast. You need to find a new solution. There is a variety of water filtration gear available online that you can reuse hundreds or even thousands of times. It is highly recommended that your survival kit includes several backups.

Your kit should be easily accessible at a moment’s notice. This means choosing a storage space in the most frequented areas of your house. Typically, the kitchen, living room, or mudroom closets are great options. Many people store kits in their garage as well, but in the event of an unpredicted flood, your kit can wind up waterlogged before you know it.


Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.

Shawn from Folkway Lodge mentioned Dave Canterbury talks about the 5 C (sometimes the 10 C’s) of preparedness. Shawn wrote: I like the 5 C’s: Cutting Tool (knife, Hatchet) Cordage (Bank Line, Paracord, Hemp Rope) Cover (Tent, Tarp, Poncho) Combustion (Fire Steel, Ferro Rod, Flint and Steel, Magnifying Glass) Container (Steel Bowl, Pot, Or Single Wall Water Bottle)
In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
Gus: I like to think I’m a realist and try to prepare for likely scenarios. In every case I can think of, when people are starving and have hit rock bottom. Whatever you have or they think you have, someone is going to try to take it from you. I think if you can’t protect yourself, family and supplies, then you’ve wasted all you’re efforts. Weapons for self defense should be a top priority on any list.

What is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a portable emergency kit that should last you for 72-hours. They’re also known as 72-hour kits, grab bags or Go Bags. The idea behind the bag is to be prepared in need of an evacuation. If your family is mandatorily, or voluntarily evacuating from your home, this kit would include all the things you’d need to survive for at least three days. So, telling you what to pack is a little tricky. It really depends on your personal needs, your surroundings and the type of emergency you might face. However, in the next few sections we’ll address the basics that should not be missed when packing a bug out bag.

Walkie Talkies are great but remember to buy rechargeable batteries and a solar battery charger. Print out or copy any important documents you may need (especially ones online) now instead of later. Build any buildings you need ,such as a smoke house or root cellar, now instead of later. Stock up on some motor oil, it can be used to lubricate and protect metal items and tools.
It is interesting how difficult it is to stop people from shopping from your stockpile, before shtf. Every time I leave town for a few days, I loose most of my stored stuff. 1. Put up security lights. 2. Put up a security camera. Stored to a backup drive. 3. Changed locks, added more bolts. Backup drive got stolen, and system was erased. Next I might get cameras to watch the cameras. Ouch. Or perhaps just send events to my phone.

Every survival kit and emergency preparedness plan should include emergency blankets and lights. Mylar blankets effectively reflect body heat, and can keep you warm throughout a cold night. Their extreme lightweight and compact size make them an ideal part of a survival kit. To ensure you have adequate light in the event of a power failure, chemical snap lights are a convenient solution that doesn’t rely on batteries. Many snap lights last for 12 hours or more, and have a five year shelf life, so you know they’ll be there for you when you need them.

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