What if you have to take in a pregnant woman or a parent with a small child? You may have to go looking for baby formula. What if your mother’s prescription medications are lost or destroyed? You may have to go looking for replacement meds. What if a crucial piece of gear is damaged? What if you need parts for your shelter or vehicle? These are just a few possibilities off the top of my head. There are dozens of situations you won’t think of until you’re in them.
Lightweight survival kits are generally seen as a backup means of survival; however, these can kits can be extensive, and have come to include tools that are generally found in larger kits as survival technology advances. Some examples of these tools are high power flashlights, rapid use saws, signal devices such as mini signal mirrors, and water purification methods.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…

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In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
Food supplies in a bug-out vehicle include hundreds of pounds of wheat, rice, and beans, and enough honey, powdered milk, canned goods, bottled fruit, vitamins, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, salt, pepper, spices, and oil for several months. In addition, the kits often contain high-calorie energy bars, a cooking kit, utensils, liquid soap, and towels. The water supplies may include bottled water, filtering kit, bottles, collapsible water containers, and chlorine bleach for water purification. Food preparation and washing equipment may include items such as a grain grinder, a bread mixer, a strainer, a manual can opener, a steam canner with canning jars and O-rings, cutlery, knives, an electric 12-volt cooler icebox, kerosene lamps and heaters, kerosene or propane stoves, extra fuel, a clothes wringer, a foot-operated treadle sewing machine, and an electric hot plate (which would require an inverter to operate off a car battery).
Shawn from Folkway Lodge mentioned Dave Canterbury talks about the 5 C (sometimes the 10 C’s) of preparedness. Shawn wrote: I like the 5 C’s: Cutting Tool (knife, Hatchet) Cordage (Bank Line, Paracord, Hemp Rope) Cover (Tent, Tarp, Poncho) Combustion (Fire Steel, Ferro Rod, Flint and Steel, Magnifying Glass) Container (Steel Bowl, Pot, Or Single Wall Water Bottle)

If your primary use would be in the event of a natural disaster, for example, you’ll need a kit that contains at least 72 hours of supplies for every member of your family. Some people also keep a gas mask in their 72 hour kit in the event of a chemical attack. But if you’re concerned about defending yourself against a horde of flesh-hungry humanoids, the Gerber Zombie Apocalypse Kit is right up your alley.
A survival kit is one of those items that you carry in your pack in case you need it, but hope you never have to open it, and if you find yourself in a situation where you have to open it, you better make dang sure it includes what you'll need. To help, here are a few considerations you'll want to take into account as you prepare your own emergency, survival, bug-out-bag, as well as some packages that have some of the vital components already included.
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