Every survival kit and emergency preparedness plan should include emergency blankets and lights. Mylar blankets effectively reflect body heat, and can keep you warm throughout a cold night. Their extreme lightweight and compact size make them an ideal part of a survival kit. To ensure you have adequate light in the event of a power failure, chemical snap lights are a convenient solution that doesn’t rely on batteries. Many snap lights last for 12 hours or more, and have a five year shelf life, so you know they’ll be there for you when you need them.
Civilians such as forestry workers, surveyors, or bush pilots, who work in remote locations or in regions with extreme climate conditions may also be equipped with survival kits. Disaster supplies are also kept on hand by those who live in areas prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters. For the average citizen to practice disaster preparedness, some towns will have survival stores to keep survival supplies in stock.
I also never see any type of plant seeds listed in case of severe problems that last longer than a few months. There are no provisions for growing your own food. Bleach is fine for producing drinkable water but also Iodine Tablets. Lastly as the Sgt has said at times it you may have to leave home. But if you can stay home and learn who your neighbors are you will probably be safer.
Knives & Sharpening tools are worth mentioning on their own. Carbon steel knives are better than stainless. Sharpening stones are a must. Possibly the best all around knife you could ever buy is a high carbon steel Mora knife ($10 on Amazon with free shipping). The material is harder than stainless steel and they have a Scandinavian grind that makes them extremely sharp, durable, and even easier to resharpen than most knives.
Shit is about to hit the fan, and I am preparing. I just don’t know that anyone can truly survive what is about to happen. My religious perspective is based wholly on Nature and science… I do not believe that belief can change galactic fact. Strange orbs in our space, and something is going on with our sun. The High Uinta’s of Utah has a potential for survival, lowest elevation begins at 6005 ft. all the way up to 13,950 ft. With a few friends and family who are on board, we have a fighting chance, but this all depends on what really transpires with sudden earth changes about to implode. When the day comes, if you survive, come to the White Rocks area for staging, or even get there before hand. It takes a village, and as such we have a chance. Bring what you can, and be prepared for the very worse. If interested to keep in touch contact now. email. or 435-340-0040… Jerry T
Lightweight survival kits are generally seen as a backup means of survival; however, these can kits can be extensive, and have come to include tools that are generally found in larger kits as survival technology advances. Some examples of these tools are high power flashlights, rapid use saws, signal devices such as mini signal mirrors, and water purification methods.
Toughbooks and Linux. Learn pgp/gpg encryption. Believe in solar and do not forget goal zero. Use internet phones and not cell phones. Everbody is listeneing and the cell towers are not encrypted. Always be thankful to your military training and learn to be self reliant. Nobody is coming to help! Develope an attitude and harden up. Say nobody is going to hurt you today or in the future. schrade knives, I hate hand guns. do your work in the dark.
This is THE BEST list of items to store for a situation..long or short term. I am including Selcos list in the equation for comparison. I have shared this with my friends. I am going food and chemist shopping tomorrow since out of all of these I feel I have everything but food and meds covered. Cheers for the best most honest list on the net apart from Selcos which I find a bit hard to keep up with and probably extreme for Australia 👌
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case.
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