It’s not paranoid to ask yourself what you would do in the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency – it’s just smart thinking. A big storm could knock out your power for an extended period of time with little advance notice. Or, frigid winter temperatures and weather could make leaving the house for supplies difficult. Be prepared for anything by stocking up on survival gear and equipment today. 

This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.  Update (1150ET): Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the Director of the Center for the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), spoke on behalf of the CDC. During the press conference, she said that the US had identified 110 people who are under observation and being tested […]
I live here in southern WV. Every county here is prepared to block all roads into and out of the county with backhoes, coal trucks, dump trucks, etc and post armed guards. Nearly everyone hear is armed. People here are poor anyhow and know very well how to ‘get by’ on little to nothing. Enough coal could be dumped along the road to heat and cook all that we need, probably in one day, for every comunity. Fresh drinking water runs out of nearly every mountain around. Many people, including myself, have gardens and give away most of what they grow. My compost pile provides most of the plants I grow because the seeds from the cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoe peels, cantalope etc just sprout naturally and I just plant them. Living where I do ain’t ALL bad! Esp when TSHTF!!!
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!
The kits provided for Soviet and Russian Cosmonauts are optimised for survival in the temperate and sub-arctic mountains, forests and grasslands in the east of the country. Soyuz spacecraft kits include "food rations, water bottles, warm clothing, rope for making a shelter using the capsule’s parachute, fish hooks and miscellaneous other survival gear". The TP-82 Cosmonaut survival pistol, was provided to defend against predators such as wolves or bears. It was able to fire conventional bullets, shotgun cartridges and flares; the folding stock could be used as a shovel and it also had a fold-out machete.[8]
Earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes can cause you to leave your home or even be trapped there. Roads could be blocked due to fallen trees, power lines, or even damaged earth from the natural disaster. Rescue crews can not be in all places at once. You may have to wait it out for quite a while before its over. You won't be able to go to the store or to the corner market.
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!
The Seventy2 Survival System is unique in that it was specifically designed and curated by survival experts. The comprehensive survival system not only includes a number of handy tools but it also offers detailed survival instructions for a number of emergency situations. The Seventy2 Survival System is an incredible pack and has been given high praise from TIME, Outside Magazine, Huffington Post, Field and Stream, and dozens of other critics. They rave over the design, quality and ease of use in survival situations.
Thats extremely naive thinking. Starve someone for a few days then see what theyd do for a can of beans. People riot after sports events for no reason, you think a stranger wouldnt kill you to feed their kids? Sure, people might band together for the 1st week, but once food and water start running out, its everyone for themselves. We’re not talking about a flood/tornado/hurricane situation here. Think WORST CASE SCENARIO.
Here’s my list of Survival and Collapse medical supplies with natural remedies included. We include natural remedies for first use or back up to save on items that won’t be produced in an austere setting. Dr.Bones and I spend a lot of time and energy researching “back-up” plans for traditional medicine. We want you to have the ability to provide medical help in a disaster scenario, and for that, you’ll need conventional medical supplies and some knowledge on what natural remedies are useful for certain situations. Below is a very ambitious list of things you should consider:
The Seventy2 Survival System is unique in that it was specifically designed and curated by survival experts. The comprehensive survival system not only includes a number of handy tools but it also offers detailed survival instructions for a number of emergency situations. The Seventy2 Survival System is an incredible pack and has been given high praise from TIME, Outside Magazine, Huffington Post, Field and Stream, and dozens of other critics. They rave over the design, quality and ease of use in survival situations.
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Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information
It is best to make your own disaster kit / emergency kit that you can make to meet your biggest area threats. You would never need a life vest if living high in the mountains. So, designing an emergency kit for your needs is very important. Many things always remain the same like your survival food supply. You can use Mountain House freeze dried food, MRE’s, Survival Cave freeze dried food, Wise freeze dried foods or any other long term storage foods. The key is planning and having your food supply before the emergency. Once something happens, the stores empty within hours. Preparing your emergency kit& survival food kits can actually save you and your family from even the worst disaster.
Freshwater may get contaminated. If it is, it requires purifying or desalinating water to satisfy hydration needs. Humans can survive only a few days without fresh water. When SHTF, your water tap will dry up fast. You need to find a new solution. There is a variety of water filtration gear available online that you can reuse hundreds or even thousands of times. It is highly recommended that your survival kit includes several backups.
Lightweight survival kits are generally seen as a backup means of survival; however, these can kits can be extensive, and have come to include tools that are generally found in larger kits as survival technology advances. Some examples of these tools are high power flashlights, rapid use saws, signal devices such as mini signal mirrors, and water purification methods.
A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.
If your primary use would be in the event of a natural disaster, for example, you’ll need a kit that contains at least 72 hours of supplies for every member of your family. Some people also keep a gas mask in their 72 hour kit in the event of a chemical attack. But if you’re concerned about defending yourself against a horde of flesh-hungry humanoids, the Gerber Zombie Apocalypse Kit is right up your alley.
I gather the writer is getting at would be when it’s no longer safe to bug in,(Staying at home) thats when it’s time to bug out.. You want to stay in place until it’s no longer safe to stay in place, ideally things should be contained after 72 hrs.. But if they’re not and law enforcement are bugging out, it’s time to get outta dodge.. I would think that out off all your preps it would be a good idea to have a percentage of them stashed(Cached) somewhere else. you don’t want to leave all your eggs in one basket while your leaving your home and you have nothing
This item needs to be of a substantial size to accommodate cutting or chopping down trees for cooking, warmth and even shelter. A hatchet or large survival knife, complete with a honing stone and sheath or carrying case is preferred. A hatchet can double as a hammer. Some survival knives even have tools in the handle, things like a compass, string saw, light fishing tackle and a small sewing kit. When SHTF, you’ll be glad you have a chopping and cutting tool on your side.
The kits provided for Soviet and Russian Cosmonauts are optimised for survival in the temperate and sub-arctic mountains, forests and grasslands in the east of the country. Soyuz spacecraft kits include "food rations, water bottles, warm clothing, rope for making a shelter using the capsule’s parachute, fish hooks and miscellaneous other survival gear". The TP-82 Cosmonaut survival pistol, was provided to defend against predators such as wolves or bears. It was able to fire conventional bullets, shotgun cartridges and flares; the folding stock could be used as a shovel and it also had a fold-out machete.[8]
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
What if you have to take in a pregnant woman or a parent with a small child? You may have to go looking for baby formula. What if your mother’s prescription medications are lost or destroyed? You may have to go looking for replacement meds. What if a crucial piece of gear is damaged? What if you need parts for your shelter or vehicle? These are just a few possibilities off the top of my head. There are dozens of situations you won’t think of until you’re in them.

Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.

First time customer and first time unboxing these widely advertised shtf boxes. Im very impressed with the quality and contents of my first shtf box. This is an instant addiction, cant wait for the March 19 box too arrive. I was blown away by the Uniden Scout Radios and the waterproof backpack. No im not an employee, im a dedicated customer at this point. Great product!!!!

In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.

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