Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
When to use a bug out bag. This is a tricky question - there is no definite answer. If some disaster occurs and there is a mandatory evacuation, obviously a pack would be good to have. However, voluntary evacuations are obviously up to you. If it becomes impossible to live in your home due to events like gas leaks, fires, nuclear disaster, flooding, etc.; you’ll want a bug out bag. However, remember that voluntary evacuations should be one of your last resorts. Leaving your home forces you to leave behind shelter, warmth, protection and possibly food.

Like many, you consider yourself a good driver and have the record to back it up. Yet, accidents and breakdowns happen. For those split-second instances when your vehicle goes from good to bad, are you prepared to deal with any potential emergencies? Don't think an accident or breakdown won't happen to you. Rather than take a chance, equip yourself with a car emergency kit.

If you live in an area that experiences natural disasters that could result in an evacuation, it’s crucial to have a pre-packed bag with sufficient supplies for traveling. Convenient “grab ‘n’ go” survival kits have everything you need to stay safe, and well-fed while making your way to safety. Food, water purification tablets, personal blankets, and other necessities are provided in a duffle bag or backpack, so you don’t have to take the time to gather supplies before heading out. Typical kits contain enough food and water for 4 adults for 3 days.

Ryan: Something I’ve always put at the top of my list is boots.  Boots that can handle some water and keep my feet dry.  Travel over any distance can be quickly go from back to horrible/impossible with damage to our feet.  In my opinion, I’ll spend a bit more for good quality and durability.  With that said, I’ve found Danner and then Vasque to be my preference.
Every survival kit and emergency preparedness plan should include emergency blankets and lights. Mylar blankets effectively reflect body heat, and can keep you warm throughout a cold night. Their extreme lightweight and compact size make them an ideal part of a survival kit. To ensure you have adequate light in the event of a power failure, chemical snap lights are a convenient solution that doesn’t rely on batteries. Many snap lights last for 12 hours or more, and have a five year shelf life, so you know they’ll be there for you when you need them. 
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