Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
Ever since this coronavirus outbreak first began, the mainstream media has been feeding us fake news over and over again.  Initially, we were repeatedly told that there was very little to be concerned about because it was very unlikely that human to human transmission was happening.  But now we know that this virus spreads very, very easily between people. 
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.
I live here in southern WV. Every county here is prepared to block all roads into and out of the county with backhoes, coal trucks, dump trucks, etc and post armed guards. Nearly everyone hear is armed. People here are poor anyhow and know very well how to ‘get by’ on little to nothing. Enough coal could be dumped along the road to heat and cook all that we need, probably in one day, for every comunity. Fresh drinking water runs out of nearly every mountain around. Many people, including myself, have gardens and give away most of what they grow. My compost pile provides most of the plants I grow because the seeds from the cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoe peels, cantalope etc just sprout naturally and I just plant them. Living where I do ain’t ALL bad! Esp when TSHTF!!!
Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information

Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.
A survival kit is one of those items that you carry in your pack in case you need it, but hope you never have to open it, and if you find yourself in a situation where you have to open it, you better make dang sure it includes what you'll need. To help, here are a few considerations you'll want to take into account as you prepare your own emergency, survival, bug-out-bag, as well as some packages that have some of the vital components already included.
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.
This survival kit comes in an ABS-plastic (1) waterproof case and includes Tinder-Quik fire starters, 150-pound-test braided nylon cord, and an emergency sewing and fishing kit. It also features military-spec stainless steel wire, a removable liquid-damped compass, a folding lock-blade knife, a rescue flash signal mirror capable of broadcasting your location up to 20 miles, and more
Civilians such as forestry workers, surveyors, or bush pilots, who work in remote locations or in regions with extreme climate conditions may also be equipped with survival kits. Disaster supplies are also kept on hand by those who live in areas prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters. For the average citizen to practice disaster preparedness, some towns will have survival stores to keep survival supplies in stock.
If you have enough room for a fishing rod and reel, that’s great. However, only the basics are really necessary: lures, fish eggs, and fishing line work. You can always organize and cast the fishing line using a tin can, bottle, or stick. If you can dig up worms with a flat stone, or even your ax or knife, that helps, too. Grubs, caterpillars and other bugs also make great bait. Check out the Paracord Pod Fishing Kit ultra light and like a tackle box in your pocket.
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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