A reliable, compact LED flashlight is indispensable for the purposes discussed here. Check out our favorite solution to this: the Hybeam Micro flashlight. The ideal way to supplement a regular flashlight is to get one that recharges by turning the attached handle. The light does not last as long as a regular flashlight. They are perfect, though, for non-emergency use to save battery power in the LED flashlights.
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The content on this site is provided as general information only. The ideas expressed on this site are solely the opinions of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the opinions of sponsors or firms affiliated with the author(s). The author may or may not have a financial interest in any company or advertiser referenced. Any action taken as a result of information, analysis, or advertisement on this site is ultimately the responsibility of the reader.


I gather the writer is getting at would be when it’s no longer safe to bug in,(Staying at home) thats when it’s time to bug out.. You want to stay in place until it’s no longer safe to stay in place, ideally things should be contained after 72 hrs.. But if they’re not and law enforcement are bugging out, it’s time to get outta dodge.. I would think that out off all your preps it would be a good idea to have a percentage of them stashed(Cached) somewhere else. you don’t want to leave all your eggs in one basket while your leaving your home and you have nothing

Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.

Lightweight survival kits are generally seen as a backup means of survival; however, these can kits can be extensive, and have come to include tools that are generally found in larger kits as survival technology advances. Some examples of these tools are high power flashlights, rapid use saws, signal devices such as mini signal mirrors, and water purification methods.

The communications equipment may include a multi-band receiver/scanner, a citizens band (CB) radio, portable "walkie-talkies" with rechargeable batteries, and a portable battery-powered television. The power supplies may include a diesel or gasoline generator with a one-month fuel supply, an auto battery and charger, extension cord, flashlights, rechargeable batteries (with recharger), an electric multi meter, and a test light. Defense items include a revolver, semi-automatic pistol, rifle, shotgun, ammunition, mace or pepper spray, and a large knife such as a KA-BAR or a bowie knife.
As Douglas wrote in his reply “It’s the simple will to survive. Call it grit, call it faith, call it down right stubbornness. I’ve heard about many times where a man has all that he should need to survive a situation, but is found dead because he didn’t think that he could. And on the other hand, I’ve heard stories about men who have cut off their leg and survived, just because they wouldn’t give up.

I also never see any type of plant seeds listed in case of severe problems that last longer than a few months. There are no provisions for growing your own food. Bleach is fine for producing drinkable water but also Iodine Tablets. Lastly as the Sgt has said at times it you may have to leave home. But if you can stay home and learn who your neighbors are you will probably be safer.
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Like many, you consider yourself a good driver and have the record to back it up. Yet, accidents and breakdowns happen. For those split-second instances when your vehicle goes from good to bad, are you prepared to deal with any potential emergencies? Don't think an accident or breakdown won't happen to you. Rather than take a chance, equip yourself with a car emergency kit.

If you have enough room for a fishing rod and reel, that’s great. However, only the basics are really necessary: lures, fish eggs, and fishing line work. You can always organize and cast the fishing line using a tin can, bottle, or stick. If you can dig up worms with a flat stone, or even your ax or knife, that helps, too. Grubs, caterpillars and other bugs also make great bait. Check out the Paracord Pod Fishing Kit ultra light and like a tackle box in your pocket.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
I gather the writer is getting at would be when it’s no longer safe to bug in,(Staying at home) thats when it’s time to bug out.. You want to stay in place until it’s no longer safe to stay in place, ideally things should be contained after 72 hrs.. But if they’re not and law enforcement are bugging out, it’s time to get outta dodge.. I would think that out off all your preps it would be a good idea to have a percentage of them stashed(Cached) somewhere else. you don’t want to leave all your eggs in one basket while your leaving your home and you have nothing
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
It’s not paranoid to ask yourself what you would do in the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency – it’s just smart thinking. A big storm could knock out your power for an extended period of time with little advance notice. Or, frigid winter temperatures and weather could make leaving the house for supplies difficult. Be prepared for anything by stocking up on survival gear and equipment today. 

If a hurricane, tornado, flood, or terrorist attack occurs, are you ready for a prolonged siege trapped inside your own home? Hurricane Irma left millions of people without water, food, and electricity for days. Per the National Center of Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, Americans are grossly unprepared for the next disaster, which they report, "will inevitably happen.”
Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information
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