For personnel who are flying over large bodies of water, in additional to wearing a survival suit over cold water, a survival kit may have additional items such as a small self inflating raft to get the aircrewman out of cold or predator infested waters, flotation vests, sea anchor, fishing nets, fishing equipment, fluorescent sea marking dye, pyrotechnical signals, a survival radio and/or radio-beacon, formerly a distress marker light replaced by a flashing strobe, formerly a seawater still[4] or chemical desalinator kit now replaced by a hand pumped reverse osmosis desalinator (MROD) for desalinating seawater, a raft repair kit, a paddle, a bailer and sponge, sunscreen, medical equipment, a whistle, a compass, and a sun shade hat.
Millions of Americans believe that in the not-too-distant future, America, and possibly the entire world, could be mired in a disaster of epic, Armageddon-sized proportions. Collectively, the apocalyptic event is known as when the SHTF. It’s the ultimate challenge to mankind’s survival. Whether it comes from social upheaval, natural, act-of-God disasters, economic failure, terrorism or war, concerned individuals are preparing for the worst.
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.

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The undisputed experts when it comes to key survival gear? The rangers who save hikers who go astray. Jeff Webb, a search-and-rescue ranger at Yosemite National Park, has worked on more than 200 rescue missions. He's also seen action in Big Bend, Yellowstone, Canyonlands, Joshua Tree, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. With his advice, our editors put together this ultimate survival kit for hikers.

Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case.


A supply of nonperishable food and water are a core necessity for every survival kit. Amazon.com offers several varieties of survival kits with emergency food for different situations. For the boat, car, or RV, high caloric density food bars are a compact and affordable way to stay safe. You’ll also find dehydrated meals in large quantities prepackaged compact bins for convenient storage. Waterproof survival kits are perfect for the basement, and contain up to three months of food for four adults.
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Gus: I like to think I’m a realist and try to prepare for likely scenarios. In every case I can think of, when people are starving and have hit rock bottom. Whatever you have or they think you have, someone is going to try to take it from you. I think if you can’t protect yourself, family and supplies, then you’ve wasted all you’re efforts. Weapons for self defense should be a top priority on any list.
Thank you for re-posting this list! It is very very comprehensive! I read through the comments and also added your reader’s additions to it for my own list! One thing I would add is a good drying rack for herbal processing! A whole lot of what you have on the list has herbal alternatives that are just as effective and without some of the side effects! I want to also add – don’t forget to look for good books on how to use the medicinal herbs you find and how to harvest them properly! My household forages and wildcrafts many herbs and spices all season long. Most of the herbs we gather are processed into tinctures, salves, and syrups. Some we hang dry to dehydrate, then store in sealed glass mason jars in a large cabinet designed to keep out light just for our herbs! We have now taken to gathering good old dollar tree spices and things like that every time we go to town to grocery shop! Pepper, salt, and garlic powder being among the chief of these.
In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.

Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
First thing he said is lose luxuries. Generators are luxuries but they run out of fuel. You will spend more time looking for fuel and spare parts or rumors of fuel and spare parts. In addition lights and noise attract unwanted attention. Said Toilet paper will be worth its weight in GOLD. Try wiping your butt with some leaves for a few months. Lastly there are several things I never see on Bug Out/In lists is any type of Pest or Rodent Control. Yes rodents ants spiders etc, will be a problem.
If possible, each teen and adult should put their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag. While the chances of such a disastrous event may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.
Walkie Talkies are great but remember to buy rechargeable batteries and a solar battery charger. Print out or copy any important documents you may need (especially ones online) now instead of later. Build any buildings you need ,such as a smoke house or root cellar, now instead of later. Stock up on some motor oil, it can be used to lubricate and protect metal items and tools.
2. Cars – You’ll want to check the glove box, under the seats, and in the trunk for snacks, tools, and other useful items. Parts of the car itself might prove useful, too. The mirrors could be used for signaling, the wiring for cordage, the upholstery for bedding and insulation, the battery for power (if someone in your group is mechanically inclined), and of course the engine parts if you need them for your own vehicle.

Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.

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