2. Cars – You’ll want to check the glove box, under the seats, and in the trunk for snacks, tools, and other useful items. Parts of the car itself might prove useful, too. The mirrors could be used for signaling, the wiring for cordage, the upholstery for bedding and insulation, the battery for power (if someone in your group is mechanically inclined), and of course the engine parts if you need them for your own vehicle.
When to use a bug out bag. This is a tricky question - there is no definite answer. If some disaster occurs and there is a mandatory evacuation, obviously a pack would be good to have. However, voluntary evacuations are obviously up to you. If it becomes impossible to live in your home due to events like gas leaks, fires, nuclear disaster, flooding, etc.; you’ll want a bug out bag. However, remember that voluntary evacuations should be one of your last resorts. Leaving your home forces you to leave behind shelter, warmth, protection and possibly food.
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.
Natural disasters and their occurrences are never known to anyone prior to the event. But, people must know about the threat in areas that are more prone to natural disasters. People also need to take personal responsibility for their own safety. Knowledge and planning is the key to survival in any emergency. Bug-out-bags, survival food supply, quality water filter, and basic survival gear are just part of not becoming a victim.
I live here in southern WV. Every county here is prepared to block all roads into and out of the county with backhoes, coal trucks, dump trucks, etc and post armed guards. Nearly everyone hear is armed. People here are poor anyhow and know very well how to ‘get by’ on little to nothing. Enough coal could be dumped along the road to heat and cook all that we need, probably in one day, for every comunity. Fresh drinking water runs out of nearly every mountain around. Many people, including myself, have gardens and give away most of what they grow. My compost pile provides most of the plants I grow because the seeds from the cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoe peels, cantalope etc just sprout naturally and I just plant them. Living where I do ain’t ALL bad! Esp when TSHTF!!!
store was a good place until I had my 2nd incident. bought 3 dozen minnows all went belly up 20 min ...after leaving the store the 2nd I bought 4 dozen more paid for them then before I left the store had 2 dozen of those dead! was told no refund or replacement and I never left the store. I am out 7 dozen minnows ($14) quick to take my money but would replace the 2 dozen that were dead before i even left the store. See More
I gather the writer is getting at would be when it’s no longer safe to bug in,(Staying at home) thats when it’s time to bug out.. You want to stay in place until it’s no longer safe to stay in place, ideally things should be contained after 72 hrs.. But if they’re not and law enforcement are bugging out, it’s time to get outta dodge.. I would think that out off all your preps it would be a good idea to have a percentage of them stashed(Cached) somewhere else. you don’t want to leave all your eggs in one basket while your leaving your home and you have nothing

While you might find certain items in your survival kit more useful than others, this will largely depend on the exact nature of your emergency. Generally, food and water are going to be the most vital items when facing any prolonged disaster. After that, items like Mylar blankets and tube tents provide shelter from the elements and fire starters can help you provide critical warmth and ability to cook food or boil water.
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
Eventually everything will be gone if you wait long enough, but if you look at actual events such as a major hurricane here in the USA, the Greece financial meltdown, the collapse of USSR, the war in Syria, the situation in Venezuela, or any poor country that has been hit by a major disaster you’ll quickly see a pattern of items that disappear at the very beginning of a panic buying rush.
A multi-purpose tool has a number of elements that go beyond simple cutting. This makes the multi-purpose tool an exceptional item to own. Things like scissors, knife, screwdriver, pliers, can opener, bottle opener, and other attached tools are not as frivolous as they may seem. In a true survival situation that impacts entire cities, regions, or countries, you may need to scavenge for foodstuffs.
A multi-purpose tool has a number of elements that go beyond simple cutting. This makes the multi-purpose tool an exceptional item to own. Things like scissors, knife, screwdriver, pliers, can opener, bottle opener, and other attached tools are not as frivolous as they may seem. In a true survival situation that impacts entire cities, regions, or countries, you may need to scavenge for foodstuffs.

There are two subjects that the mainstream media seems specifically determined to avoid discussing these days when it comes to the economy – the first is the problem of falling global demand for goods and services; they absolutely refuse to acknowledge the fact that demand is going stagnant and will conjure all kinds of rationalizations to distract from the issue. The other subject is the debt bubble, the corporate debt bubble in particular.
This is THE BEST list of items to store for a situation..long or short term. I am including Selcos list in the equation for comparison. I have shared this with my friends. I am going food and chemist shopping tomorrow since out of all of these I feel I have everything but food and meds covered. Cheers for the best most honest list on the net apart from Selcos which I find a bit hard to keep up with and probably extreme for Australia 👌
Turns out that the houses about a block below our house was getting flooded. Apx. 2 blocks worth of houses and the housing addition next to us also got flooded. The active creek is down there and it was flowing like a big river in the creek AND thru the street. (The neighbors had to go save a couple that cut a hole thru their roof to get out.) Frighting!
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
Ryan: Something I’ve always put at the top of my list is boots.  Boots that can handle some water and keep my feet dry.  Travel over any distance can be quickly go from back to horrible/impossible with damage to our feet.  In my opinion, I’ll spend a bit more for good quality and durability.  With that said, I’ve found Danner and then Vasque to be my preference.
SHTF stands for Sh*t Hits the Fan. The Internet is fairly replete with information on what to expect and how to prepare for such a catastrophe. However, even governments have accepted the possibility of a rapid, overnight natural disaster, or the downfall of civilized society. Huge underground warehouses were built and are stocked with seeds from nearly every tree and plant known to man.
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I gather the writer is getting at would be when it’s no longer safe to bug in,(Staying at home) thats when it’s time to bug out.. You want to stay in place until it’s no longer safe to stay in place, ideally things should be contained after 72 hrs.. But if they’re not and law enforcement are bugging out, it’s time to get outta dodge.. I would think that out off all your preps it would be a good idea to have a percentage of them stashed(Cached) somewhere else. you don’t want to leave all your eggs in one basket while your leaving your home and you have nothing
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.

Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
A reliable, compact LED flashlight is indispensable for the purposes discussed here. Check out our favorite solution to this: the Hybeam Micro flashlight. The ideal way to supplement a regular flashlight is to get one that recharges by turning the attached handle. The light does not last as long as a regular flashlight. They are perfect, though, for non-emergency use to save battery power in the LED flashlights.
The world today suffers from highly fragile economic and geopolitical conditions.  This is not news to most people in the liberty movement that have been tracking the downward spiral for years, but it is news to a majority of average Americans who rarely venture to get in-depth information on any issue.  The fact of the matter is, even though there are millions of us who are aware of the danger, we are still in a minority.

Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.

As Douglas wrote in his reply “It’s the simple will to survive. Call it grit, call it faith, call it down right stubbornness. I’ve heard about many times where a man has all that he should need to survive a situation, but is found dead because he didn’t think that he could. And on the other hand, I’ve heard stories about men who have cut off their leg and survived, just because they wouldn’t give up.

Knives & Sharpening tools are worth mentioning on their own. Carbon steel knives are better than stainless. Sharpening stones are a must. Possibly the best all around knife you could ever buy is a high carbon steel Mora knife ($10 on Amazon with free shipping). The material is harder than stainless steel and they have a Scandinavian grind that makes them extremely sharp, durable, and even easier to resharpen than most knives.

Here’s my list of Survival and Collapse medical supplies with natural remedies included. We include natural remedies for first use or back up to save on items that won’t be produced in an austere setting. Dr.Bones and I spend a lot of time and energy researching “back-up” plans for traditional medicine. We want you to have the ability to provide medical help in a disaster scenario, and for that, you’ll need conventional medical supplies and some knowledge on what natural remedies are useful for certain situations. Below is a very ambitious list of things you should consider:
Shit is about to hit the fan, and I am preparing. I just don’t know that anyone can truly survive what is about to happen. My religious perspective is based wholly on Nature and science… I do not believe that belief can change galactic fact. Strange orbs in our space, and something is going on with our sun. The High Uinta’s of Utah has a potential for survival, lowest elevation begins at 6005 ft. all the way up to 13,950 ft. With a few friends and family who are on board, we have a fighting chance, but this all depends on what really transpires with sudden earth changes about to implode. When the day comes, if you survive, come to the White Rocks area for staging, or even get there before hand. It takes a village, and as such we have a chance. Bring what you can, and be prepared for the very worse. If interested to keep in touch contact now. email. or 435-340-0040… Jerry T
Humanity, during a time of crisis, splits into moral pieces. Those who care about others will, like you said, show their best…Then there is the other side, the selfish, there will be those that will walk by and leave someone in need or take from someone to benefit themselves. Survival instincts makes us think isolation is the safest way, but that is only short term, humans are a social creature and we work better and create things better in social groups. Humanity, as a whole, will overcome the SHTF event by coming together and working towards a common problem. I think out of initial fear most will keep to themselves but eventually they will need to overcome their fears and regroup to bring back what was lost.
Turns out that the houses about a block below our house was getting flooded. Apx. 2 blocks worth of houses and the housing addition next to us also got flooded. The active creek is down there and it was flowing like a big river in the creek AND thru the street. (The neighbors had to go save a couple that cut a hole thru their roof to get out.) Frighting!
If possible, each teen and adult should put their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag. While the chances of such a disastrous event may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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