I look forward to my delivery every month. I used to belong to another monthly box that had different themes every month. I found so much of their stuff to be worthless. I mean why would I want/need a cigar. I find the items in these boxes fun and interesting. Many items I have seen on the website and considered buying. I only wish there was a way to suggest different items. - Robert Nash
Thank you for re-posting this list! It is very very comprehensive! I read through the comments and also added your reader’s additions to it for my own list! One thing I would add is a good drying rack for herbal processing! A whole lot of what you have on the list has herbal alternatives that are just as effective and without some of the side effects! I want to also add – don’t forget to look for good books on how to use the medicinal herbs you find and how to harvest them properly! My household forages and wildcrafts many herbs and spices all season long. Most of the herbs we gather are processed into tinctures, salves, and syrups. Some we hang dry to dehydrate, then store in sealed glass mason jars in a large cabinet designed to keep out light just for our herbs! We have now taken to gathering good old dollar tree spices and things like that every time we go to town to grocery shop! Pepper, salt, and garlic powder being among the chief of these.
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This item needs to be of a substantial size to accommodate cutting or chopping down trees for cooking, warmth and even shelter. A hatchet or large survival knife, complete with a honing stone and sheath or carrying case is preferred. A hatchet can double as a hammer. Some survival knives even have tools in the handle, things like a compass, string saw, light fishing tackle and a small sewing kit. When SHTF, you’ll be glad you have a chopping and cutting tool on your side.
Millions of Americans believe that in the not-too-distant future, America, and possibly the entire world, could be mired in a disaster of epic, Armageddon-sized proportions. Collectively, the apocalyptic event is known as when the SHTF. It’s the ultimate challenge to mankind’s survival. Whether it comes from social upheaval, natural, act-of-God disasters, economic failure, terrorism or war, concerned individuals are preparing for the worst.

Knives & Sharpening tools are worth mentioning on their own. Carbon steel knives are better than stainless. Sharpening stones are a must. Possibly the best all around knife you could ever buy is a high carbon steel Mora knife ($10 on Amazon with free shipping). The material is harder than stainless steel and they have a Scandinavian grind that makes them extremely sharp, durable, and even easier to resharpen than most knives.
make a map of areas covered and items for future use when in need. the list and map can be passed to others in your group that would save time vertically all office buildings and factories must have emer. lighting to allow exit when the power fails or fire blocks vision these have rechargeable batteries. while these are not the best type they will provide lighting and are easily recharged. circuit boards that are in them will provide a way to recharge the batteries. also they have candy machines that could be emptied quickly things like toilet paper is usual stored in adequate supplies. some places provide sanitary supplies for women hilos could provide batteries as well. places large enough to service their cars and trucks would have oil and fuel. this is where the list will come in handy so others can find it easily.

Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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