SHTF stands for Sh*t Hits the Fan. The Internet is fairly replete with information on what to expect and how to prepare for such a catastrophe. However, even governments have accepted the possibility of a rapid, overnight natural disaster, or the downfall of civilized society. Huge underground warehouses were built and are stocked with seeds from nearly every tree and plant known to man.
A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.
First off I'm not big on buying mystery boxes. In my experience they are usually crap the site can't sell. This box was purchased for me by my wife and I was surprised. The box came with two really good knives, a sweet cap, a quality monocular, a really bright flashlight, and a useless little multi tool. I would recommend this box to anyone and I'm looking forward to the next month's box. - Steven H.
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob
It’s not paranoid to ask yourself what you would do in the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency – it’s just smart thinking. A big storm could knock out your power for an extended period of time with little advance notice. Or, frigid winter temperatures and weather could make leaving the house for supplies difficult. Be prepared for anything by stocking up on survival gear and equipment today. 
If you have enough room for a fishing rod and reel, that’s great. However, only the basics are really necessary: lures, fish eggs, and fishing line work. You can always organize and cast the fishing line using a tin can, bottle, or stick. If you can dig up worms with a flat stone, or even your ax or knife, that helps, too. Grubs, caterpillars and other bugs also make great bait. Check out the Paracord Pod Fishing Kit ultra light and like a tackle box in your pocket.
In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.
Ryan: Something I’ve always put at the top of my list is boots.  Boots that can handle some water and keep my feet dry.  Travel over any distance can be quickly go from back to horrible/impossible with damage to our feet.  In my opinion, I’ll spend a bit more for good quality and durability.  With that said, I’ve found Danner and then Vasque to be my preference.

Shit is about to hit the fan, and I am preparing. I just don’t know that anyone can truly survive what is about to happen. My religious perspective is based wholly on Nature and science… I do not believe that belief can change galactic fact. Strange orbs in our space, and something is going on with our sun. The High Uinta’s of Utah has a potential for survival, lowest elevation begins at 6005 ft. all the way up to 13,950 ft. With a few friends and family who are on board, we have a fighting chance, but this all depends on what really transpires with sudden earth changes about to implode. When the day comes, if you survive, come to the White Rocks area for staging, or even get there before hand. It takes a village, and as such we have a chance. Bring what you can, and be prepared for the very worse. If interested to keep in touch contact now. email. or 435-340-0040… Jerry T
The Deluxe Car Emergency Kit from GetReadyNow comes in a clear, heavy-duty dry bag to keep supplies from getting wet and to allow for easy visibility. It fits conveniently under the seat and contains an LED headlamp with batteries, 4 Millennium food bars, 8 water pouches, LED glow sticks, waste disposal bags, Mylar blankets, ponchos, a 46-piece first aid kit, and much more!
I live here in southern WV. Every county here is prepared to block all roads into and out of the county with backhoes, coal trucks, dump trucks, etc and post armed guards. Nearly everyone hear is armed. People here are poor anyhow and know very well how to ‘get by’ on little to nothing. Enough coal could be dumped along the road to heat and cook all that we need, probably in one day, for every comunity. Fresh drinking water runs out of nearly every mountain around. Many people, including myself, have gardens and give away most of what they grow. My compost pile provides most of the plants I grow because the seeds from the cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoe peels, cantalope etc just sprout naturally and I just plant them. Living where I do ain’t ALL bad! Esp when TSHTF!!!
Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.

The thing I find pretty sad about a lot of these prep sites is the thought that society falls apart once something like this happens, in my experience of natural disasters, these times are when humanity is at its best and everyone helps thier neighbours. Good people become better people. But then I live in Australia, and have never been to America.

The undisputed experts when it comes to key survival gear? The rangers who save hikers who go astray. Jeff Webb, a search-and-rescue ranger at Yosemite National Park, has worked on more than 200 rescue missions. He's also seen action in Big Bend, Yellowstone, Canyonlands, Joshua Tree, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. With his advice, our editors put together this ultimate survival kit for hikers.
Matches are fine, but they can get easily ruined by water or even humidity and mildew. It is best to go with what is called a permanent match, or a flint or magnesium rod. The permanent match is an enclosed “match” that stores inside a metal container and lights up when removed from the container. The flint and magnesium rods, when scraped with a steel object such as a knife blade, create sparks that ignite dry tinder and paper. In the eventuality that you do not have any tinder or paper, cotton balls soaked with petroleum jelly work exceptionally well.

Thats extremely naive thinking. Starve someone for a few days then see what theyd do for a can of beans. People riot after sports events for no reason, you think a stranger wouldnt kill you to feed their kids? Sure, people might band together for the 1st week, but once food and water start running out, its everyone for themselves. We’re not talking about a flood/tornado/hurricane situation here. Think WORST CASE SCENARIO.


For personnel who are flying over large bodies of water, in additional to wearing a survival suit over cold water, a survival kit may have additional items such as a small self inflating raft to get the aircrewman out of cold or predator infested waters, flotation vests, sea anchor, fishing nets, fishing equipment, fluorescent sea marking dye, pyrotechnical signals, a survival radio and/or radio-beacon, formerly a distress marker light replaced by a flashing strobe, formerly a seawater still[4] or chemical desalinator kit now replaced by a hand pumped reverse osmosis desalinator (MROD) for desalinating seawater, a raft repair kit, a paddle, a bailer and sponge, sunscreen, medical equipment, a whistle, a compass, and a sun shade hat.

If a hurricane, tornado, flood, or terrorist attack occurs, are you ready for a prolonged siege trapped inside your own home? Hurricane Irma left millions of people without water, food, and electricity for days. Per the National Center of Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University, Americans are grossly unprepared for the next disaster, which they report, "will inevitably happen.”
What is a bug out bag? A bug out bag is a portable emergency kit that should last you for 72-hours. They’re also known as 72-hour kits, grab bags or Go Bags. The idea behind the bag is to be prepared in need of an evacuation. If your family is mandatorily, or voluntarily evacuating from your home, this kit would include all the things you’d need to survive for at least three days. So, telling you what to pack is a little tricky. It really depends on your personal needs, your surroundings and the type of emergency you might face. However, in the next few sections we’ll address the basics that should not be missed when packing a bug out bag.
The world today suffers from highly fragile economic and geopolitical conditions.  This is not news to most people in the liberty movement that have been tracking the downward spiral for years, but it is news to a majority of average Americans who rarely venture to get in-depth information on any issue.  The fact of the matter is, even though there are millions of us who are aware of the danger, we are still in a minority.
It is really important to know what all you actually need to prepare yourself and your family for an emergency. The first and foremost thing is the first aid kit. It is really important to store your firstaid supplies in a sturdy box or nylon case. But the point to remember is that, the case should be easy to carry and water proof. It is better to keep all the important medicines in your case and also make sure they are not expired.

It is best to make your own disaster kit / emergency kit that you can make to meet your biggest area threats. You would never need a life vest if living high in the mountains. So, designing an emergency kit for your needs is very important. Many things always remain the same like your survival food supply. You can use Mountain House freeze dried food, MRE’s, Survival Cave freeze dried food, Wise freeze dried foods or any other long term storage foods. The key is planning and having your food supply before the emergency. Once something happens, the stores empty within hours. Preparing your emergency kit& survival food kits can actually save you and your family from even the worst disaster.


The Bighorn First Aid Kit contains sterile bandage materials, care for wounds, blisters, and burns, a CPR face shield, fracture and sprain care, essentials tools, common medications, and a “Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine.” It is designed to help you provide hospital-quality care for up to seven people on trips lasting up to a week in length.
The term "survival kit" may also refer to the larger, portable survival kits prepared by survivalists, called "bug-out bags" (BOBs), "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERKs) or "get out of Dodge" (GOOD) kits, which are packed into backpacks, or even duffel bags. These kits are designed specifically to be more easily carried by the individual in case alternate forms of transportation are unavailable or impossible to use.
A multi-purpose tool has a number of elements that go beyond simple cutting. This makes the multi-purpose tool an exceptional item to own. Things like scissors, knife, screwdriver, pliers, can opener, bottle opener, and other attached tools are not as frivolous as they may seem. In a true survival situation that impacts entire cities, regions, or countries, you may need to scavenge for foodstuffs.
The world today suffers from highly fragile economic and geopolitical conditions.  This is not news to most people in the liberty movement that have been tracking the downward spiral for years, but it is news to a majority of average Americans who rarely venture to get in-depth information on any issue.  The fact of the matter is, even though there are millions of us who are aware of the danger, we are still in a minority.
This survival kit is packed with the essential supplies so that you will need to survive an emergency for up to 72 hours. It is built to last and all of the gear is packed nicely in a backpack with comfortable carry straps. The kit contains; food, water, emergency radio, medical and hygiene supplies, survival tools, supplies for warmth and shelter and more.
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7]
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