Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case.

This is THE BEST list of items to store for a situation..long or short term. I am including Selcos list in the equation for comparison. I have shared this with my friends. I am going food and chemist shopping tomorrow since out of all of these I feel I have everything but food and meds covered. Cheers for the best most honest list on the net apart from Selcos which I find a bit hard to keep up with and probably extreme for Australia đź‘Ś


A reliable, compact LED flashlight is indispensable for the purposes discussed here. Check out our favorite solution to this: the Hybeam Micro flashlight. The ideal way to supplement a regular flashlight is to get one that recharges by turning the attached handle. The light does not last as long as a regular flashlight. They are perfect, though, for non-emergency use to save battery power in the LED flashlights.

Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.

Other small kits are wearable and built into everyday carry survival bracelets or belts. Most often these are paracord bracelets with tools woven inside. Several tools such as firestarter, buckles, whistles and compass are on the exterior of the gear and smaller tools are woven inside the jewelry or belt and only accessible by taking the bracelet apart.
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
Will have to totally disagree on this one. Cleaning up after using a menstrual cup is like birthing a kitten…speaking from personal experience. When it comes to my monthly when SHTF, I would much rather have a cleaner process overall. You are already having to dispose of blood/bloody items, why not just make it a more pleasurable experience. Also, water is probably going to be a precious commodity…don’t want to waste it washing out pads. Just IMHO.

Like many, you consider yourself a good driver and have the record to back it up. Yet, accidents and breakdowns happen. For those split-second instances when your vehicle goes from good to bad, are you prepared to deal with any potential emergencies? Don't think an accident or breakdown won't happen to you. Rather than take a chance, equip yourself with a car emergency kit.
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