Thats extremely naive thinking. Starve someone for a few days then see what theyd do for a can of beans. People riot after sports events for no reason, you think a stranger wouldnt kill you to feed their kids? Sure, people might band together for the 1st week, but once food and water start running out, its everyone for themselves. We’re not talking about a flood/tornado/hurricane situation here. Think WORST CASE SCENARIO.
Food supplies in a bug-out vehicle include hundreds of pounds of wheat, rice, and beans, and enough honey, powdered milk, canned goods, bottled fruit, vitamins, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, salt, pepper, spices, and oil for several months. In addition, the kits often contain high-calorie energy bars, a cooking kit, utensils, liquid soap, and towels. The water supplies may include bottled water, filtering kit, bottles, collapsible water containers, and chlorine bleach for water purification. Food preparation and washing equipment may include items such as a grain grinder, a bread mixer, a strainer, a manual can opener, a steam canner with canning jars and O-rings, cutlery, knives, an electric 12-volt cooler icebox, kerosene lamps and heaters, kerosene or propane stoves, extra fuel, a clothes wringer, a foot-operated treadle sewing machine, and an electric hot plate (which would require an inverter to operate off a car battery).
Civilians such as forestry workers, surveyors, or bush pilots, who work in remote locations or in regions with extreme climate conditions may also be equipped with survival kits. Disaster supplies are also kept on hand by those who live in areas prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters. For the average citizen to practice disaster preparedness, some towns will have survival stores to keep survival supplies in stock.
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.

In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.


On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…

Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
store was a good place until I had my 2nd incident. bought 3 dozen minnows all went belly up 20 min ...after leaving the store the 2nd I bought 4 dozen more paid for them then before I left the store had 2 dozen of those dead! was told no refund or replacement and I never left the store. I am out 7 dozen minnows ($14) quick to take my money but would replace the 2 dozen that were dead before i even left the store. See More
What happens when a disaster hits while you are on the road? Survival Supply has you covered in this area, as well. For preparing your any type of auto disaster, from a breakdown to a whiteout, go with a thorough roadside kit from our store. Each of our auto emergency kits has just the right supplies for handling standard car problems, increasing your visibility in the dark, and signaling for help.
Include basics like band-aids, material for tourniquets, eye pads and cloth compresses, safety pins, thermometers, compass, antibiotics, and painkillers. Place them in a waterproof container, preferably something flexible. It conforms to the inside of a backpack or duffel bag and uses less space this way. A double-zippered plastic bag is one option to consider.
Ever since this coronavirus outbreak first began, the mainstream media has been feeding us fake news over and over again.  Initially, we were repeatedly told that there was very little to be concerned about because it was very unlikely that human to human transmission was happening.  But now we know that this virus spreads very, very easily between people. 
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
×