Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.
I also never see any type of plant seeds listed in case of severe problems that last longer than a few months. There are no provisions for growing your own food. Bleach is fine for producing drinkable water but also Iodine Tablets. Lastly as the Sgt has said at times it you may have to leave home. But if you can stay home and learn who your neighbors are you will probably be safer.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
It’s not paranoid to ask yourself what you would do in the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency – it’s just smart thinking. A big storm could knock out your power for an extended period of time with little advance notice. Or, frigid winter temperatures and weather could make leaving the house for supplies difficult. Be prepared for anything by stocking up on survival gear and equipment today. 
The world today suffers from highly fragile economic and geopolitical conditions.  This is not news to most people in the liberty movement that have been tracking the downward spiral for years, but it is news to a majority of average Americans who rarely venture to get in-depth information on any issue.  The fact of the matter is, even though there are millions of us who are aware of the danger, we are still in a minority.
"Mini survival kits" or "Altoids tin" survival kits are small kits that contain a few basic survival tools. These kits often include a small compass, waterproof matches, minimum fishing tackle, large plastic bag, small candle, jigsaw blade, craft knife or scalpel blade, and/or a safety pin/s. Pre-packaged survival kits may also include instructions in survival techniques, including fire-starting or first aid methods. In addition, parachute cord can be wrapped around the tin. The parachute cord can be used for setting up an emergency shelter or snaring small animals. They are designed to fit within a container roughly the size of a mint tin.

This survival kit comes in an ABS-plastic (1) waterproof case and includes Tinder-Quik fire starters, 150-pound-test braided nylon cord, and an emergency sewing and fishing kit. It also features military-spec stainless steel wire, a removable liquid-damped compass, a folding lock-blade knife, a rescue flash signal mirror capable of broadcasting your location up to 20 miles, and more
Civilians such as forestry workers, surveyors, or bush pilots, who work in remote locations or in regions with extreme climate conditions may also be equipped with survival kits. Disaster supplies are also kept on hand by those who live in areas prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters. For the average citizen to practice disaster preparedness, some towns will have survival stores to keep survival supplies in stock.
If possible, each teen and adult should put their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag. While the chances of such a disastrous event may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.
As Douglas wrote in his reply “It’s the simple will to survive. Call it grit, call it faith, call it down right stubbornness. I’ve heard about many times where a man has all that he should need to survive a situation, but is found dead because he didn’t think that he could. And on the other hand, I’ve heard stories about men who have cut off their leg and survived, just because they wouldn’t give up.
In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.

Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.


Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
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