Selecting the right kit requires an understanding of the situations you’re most likely to need it for. A helpful exercise can be to create a list of 10 items you’d absolutely need in the event of a natural disaster or extended period without power and access to food and water. Then make a list of another 20 to 3o supplies you’d also like to have handy in this situation. This will give you a great baseline to help you narrow down your options.
Food supplies in a bug-out vehicle include hundreds of pounds of wheat, rice, and beans, and enough honey, powdered milk, canned goods, bottled fruit, vitamins, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, salt, pepper, spices, and oil for several months. In addition, the kits often contain high-calorie energy bars, a cooking kit, utensils, liquid soap, and towels. The water supplies may include bottled water, filtering kit, bottles, collapsible water containers, and chlorine bleach for water purification. Food preparation and washing equipment may include items such as a grain grinder, a bread mixer, a strainer, a manual can opener, a steam canner with canning jars and O-rings, cutlery, knives, an electric 12-volt cooler icebox, kerosene lamps and heaters, kerosene or propane stoves, extra fuel, a clothes wringer, a foot-operated treadle sewing machine, and an electric hot plate (which would require an inverter to operate off a car battery).

If possible, each teen and adult should put their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag. While the chances of such a disastrous event may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.
Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.
Will have to totally disagree on this one. Cleaning up after using a menstrual cup is like birthing a kitten…speaking from personal experience. When it comes to my monthly when SHTF, I would much rather have a cleaner process overall. You are already having to dispose of blood/bloody items, why not just make it a more pleasurable experience. Also, water is probably going to be a precious commodity…don’t want to waste it washing out pads. Just IMHO.
When to use a bug out bag. This is a tricky question - there is no definite answer. If some disaster occurs and there is a mandatory evacuation, obviously a pack would be good to have. However, voluntary evacuations are obviously up to you. If it becomes impossible to live in your home due to events like gas leaks, fires, nuclear disaster, flooding, etc.; you’ll want a bug out bag. However, remember that voluntary evacuations should be one of your last resorts. Leaving your home forces you to leave behind shelter, warmth, protection and possibly food.
The term "survival kit" may also refer to the larger, portable survival kits prepared by survivalists, called "bug-out bags" (BOBs), "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERKs) or "get out of Dodge" (GOOD) kits, which are packed into backpacks, or even duffel bags. These kits are designed specifically to be more easily carried by the individual in case alternate forms of transportation are unavailable or impossible to use.
Gus: I like to think I’m a realist and try to prepare for likely scenarios. In every case I can think of, when people are starving and have hit rock bottom. Whatever you have or they think you have, someone is going to try to take it from you. I think if you can’t protect yourself, family and supplies, then you’ve wasted all you’re efforts. Weapons for self defense should be a top priority on any list.

I live here in southern WV. Every county here is prepared to block all roads into and out of the county with backhoes, coal trucks, dump trucks, etc and post armed guards. Nearly everyone hear is armed. People here are poor anyhow and know very well how to ‘get by’ on little to nothing. Enough coal could be dumped along the road to heat and cook all that we need, probably in one day, for every comunity. Fresh drinking water runs out of nearly every mountain around. Many people, including myself, have gardens and give away most of what they grow. My compost pile provides most of the plants I grow because the seeds from the cucumbers, tomatoes, potatoe peels, cantalope etc just sprout naturally and I just plant them. Living where I do ain’t ALL bad! Esp when TSHTF!!!
Thank you for re-posting this list! It is very very comprehensive! I read through the comments and also added your reader’s additions to it for my own list! One thing I would add is a good drying rack for herbal processing! A whole lot of what you have on the list has herbal alternatives that are just as effective and without some of the side effects! I want to also add – don’t forget to look for good books on how to use the medicinal herbs you find and how to harvest them properly! My household forages and wildcrafts many herbs and spices all season long. Most of the herbs we gather are processed into tinctures, salves, and syrups. Some we hang dry to dehydrate, then store in sealed glass mason jars in a large cabinet designed to keep out light just for our herbs! We have now taken to gathering good old dollar tree spices and things like that every time we go to town to grocery shop! Pepper, salt, and garlic powder being among the chief of these.

make a map of areas covered and items for future use when in need. the list and map can be passed to others in your group that would save time vertically all office buildings and factories must have emer. lighting to allow exit when the power fails or fire blocks vision these have rechargeable batteries. while these are not the best type they will provide lighting and are easily recharged. circuit boards that are in them will provide a way to recharge the batteries. also they have candy machines that could be emptied quickly things like toilet paper is usual stored in adequate supplies. some places provide sanitary supplies for women hilos could provide batteries as well. places large enough to service their cars and trucks would have oil and fuel. this is where the list will come in handy so others can find it easily.
Tools may include cutting tools such as saws, axes and hatchets; mechanical advantage aids such as a pry bar or wrecking bar, ropes, pulleys, or a 'come-a-long" hand-operated winch; construction tools such as pliers, chisels, a hammer, screwdrivers, a hand-operated twist drill, vise grip pliers, glue, nails, nuts, bolts, and screws; mechanical repair tools such as an arc welder, an oxy-acetylene torch, a propane torch with a spark lighter, a solder iron and flux, wrench set, a nut driver, a tap and die set, a socket set, and a fire extinguisher. As well, some survivalists bring barterable items such as fishing line, liquid soap, insect repellent, light bulbs, can openers, extra fuels, motor oil, and ammunition.
Lifeboat survival kits are stowed in inflatable or rigid lifeboats or life rafts; the contents of these kits are mandated by coast guard or maritime regulations. These kits provide basic survival tools and supplies to enable passengers to survive until they are rescued. In addition to relying on lifeboat survival kits, many mariners will assemble a "ditch bag" or "abandon ship bag" containing additional survival supplies. Lifeboat survival kit items typically include:
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.

I also never see any type of plant seeds listed in case of severe problems that last longer than a few months. There are no provisions for growing your own food. Bleach is fine for producing drinkable water but also Iodine Tablets. Lastly as the Sgt has said at times it you may have to leave home. But if you can stay home and learn who your neighbors are you will probably be safer.

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