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We found this awesome list of survival medical supplies over at Doom and Bloom, and we have to give credit where credit is due, this is one of the most inclusive and exhaustive lists of medical supplies one would need for most any survival situation. In fact, it’s more likely than not if you were to stockpile all of these items, you would be the new-age Dr. Quin Medicine Woman when SHTF.
Matches are fine, but they can get easily ruined by water or even humidity and mildew. It is best to go with what is called a permanent match, or a flint or magnesium rod. The permanent match is an enclosed “match” that stores inside a metal container and lights up when removed from the container. The flint and magnesium rods, when scraped with a steel object such as a knife blade, create sparks that ignite dry tinder and paper. In the eventuality that you do not have any tinder or paper, cotton balls soaked with petroleum jelly work exceptionally well.
A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7]
If you live in an area that experiences natural disasters that could result in an evacuation, it’s crucial to have a pre-packed bag with sufficient supplies for traveling. Convenient “grab ‘n’ go” survival kits have everything you need to stay safe, and well-fed while making your way to safety. Food, water purification tablets, personal blankets, and other necessities are provided in a duffle bag or backpack, so you don’t have to take the time to gather supplies before heading out. Typical kits contain enough food and water for 4 adults for 3 days.
If your primary use would be in the event of a natural disaster, for example, you’ll need a kit that contains at least 72 hours of supplies for every member of your family. Some people also keep a gas mask in their 72 hour kit in the event of a chemical attack. But if you’re concerned about defending yourself against a horde of flesh-hungry humanoids, the Gerber Zombie Apocalypse Kit is right up your alley.
This is THE BEST list of items to store for a situation..long or short term. I am including Selcos list in the equation for comparison. I have shared this with my friends. I am going food and chemist shopping tomorrow since out of all of these I feel I have everything but food and meds covered. Cheers for the best most honest list on the net apart from Selcos which I find a bit hard to keep up with and probably extreme for Australia 👌
Will have to totally disagree on this one. Cleaning up after using a menstrual cup is like birthing a kitten…speaking from personal experience. When it comes to my monthly when SHTF, I would much rather have a cleaner process overall. You are already having to dispose of blood/bloody items, why not just make it a more pleasurable experience. Also, water is probably going to be a precious commodity…don’t want to waste it washing out pads. Just IMHO.
Lifeboat survival kits are stowed in inflatable or rigid lifeboats or life rafts; the contents of these kits are mandated by coast guard or maritime regulations. These kits provide basic survival tools and supplies to enable passengers to survive until they are rescued. In addition to relying on lifeboat survival kits, many mariners will assemble a "ditch bag" or "abandon ship bag" containing additional survival supplies. Lifeboat survival kit items typically include:
acronyms bug out bag bushcraft camping chickens cooking Disease diy family first aid food frugal gear guide heating homemade homesteading how to hurricane natural disaster news off grid pets prepping rabbits review self reliant self sufficiency self sustainable living severe weather shelter shtf skills stockpile survival urban video water wilderness winter wood
Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.
In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
The Bighorn First Aid Kit contains sterile bandage materials, care for wounds, blisters, and burns, a CPR face shield, fracture and sprain care, essentials tools, common medications, and a “Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness and Travel Medicine.” It is designed to help you provide hospital-quality care for up to seven people on trips lasting up to a week in length.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob

The rest of the world is laughing at us.  After what just took place in Iowa, we certainly do not have any right to lecture other nations about how to run their elections.  It was a dumpster fire of epic proportions, and the entire globe is talking about it.  Apparently the Democrats have decided to run their elections the same way that they run their cities. 
Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
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