Preparing for a large scale disaster can be a challenge. As with any challenge worth tackling, it is important to rely on solid answers to common questions that will lay the foundation to success: Where do I start to get prepared? How do I know what supplies I really need? Where do I store them? How often should I update the supplies? How much does it all cost? Is there a company that I can partner with before a disaster strikes? SOS Survival Products has been answering these questions since 1989. We are your preparedness partner before, during and after a disaster.
Where was aid and law enforcement during hurricane Katrina? No where to be found. Aid took too long to arrive and most not all law enforcement took off to tend to their family. If things get bad you can’t rely on aid it could take weeks, maybe months like some war torn Country’s only get aid if their is a cease fire. In some certain situations it could take years to get aid and if things get really bad in the world you may never get aid as everyone is on their own. Look at Ethiopia they are hit hard with droughts again that hasn’t been as bad since the 80’s and 90’s. They are screaming for aid and get very little. You need to rely on nobody but yourself in a time of crisis. Sure if aid comes fantastic that’s great but if not you need to prepare and not just a JIC, BOB, or a SHTF bag but you need to stockpile water and food in your home along with having permanent solutions to clean drinking water and food that’s a must for survival. Bags will only get you so far. The best purchase anyone can make is a 5th wheel stockpile everything in it. Fort Mcmurray in Alberta the wild fire known as the “Beast” The biggest evacuation in Canada anybody that left the city with a 5th wheel or trailer lived in them till their home got rebuilt three years later. Anything can happen the question is are you prepared for it?
Unfortunately that doesn’t translate well to larger scale disasters. Opportunistic looters and thugs come out to do what they do best, and if things are bad enough that society breaks down totally the normal people will go to extreme lengths to protect themselves and their families. That’s what we usually talk about when we say you should be prepared.
2. Cars – You’ll want to check the glove box, under the seats, and in the trunk for snacks, tools, and other useful items. Parts of the car itself might prove useful, too. The mirrors could be used for signaling, the wiring for cordage, the upholstery for bedding and insulation, the battery for power (if someone in your group is mechanically inclined), and of course the engine parts if you need them for your own vehicle.

Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
Matches are fine, but they can get easily ruined by water or even humidity and mildew. It is best to go with what is called a permanent match, or a flint or magnesium rod. The permanent match is an enclosed “match” that stores inside a metal container and lights up when removed from the container. The flint and magnesium rods, when scraped with a steel object such as a knife blade, create sparks that ignite dry tinder and paper. In the eventuality that you do not have any tinder or paper, cotton balls soaked with petroleum jelly work exceptionally well.
The term "survival kit" may also refer to the larger, portable survival kits prepared by survivalists, called "bug-out bags" (BOBs), "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERKs) or "get out of Dodge" (GOOD) kits, which are packed into backpacks, or even duffel bags. These kits are designed specifically to be more easily carried by the individual in case alternate forms of transportation are unavailable or impossible to use.
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