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It’s not paranoid to ask yourself what you would do in the event of a natural disaster or another type of emergency – it’s just smart thinking. A big storm could knock out your power for an extended period of time with little advance notice. Or, frigid winter temperatures and weather could make leaving the house for supplies difficult. Be prepared for anything by stocking up on survival gear and equipment today. 
Like many, you consider yourself a good driver and have the record to back it up. Yet, accidents and breakdowns happen. For those split-second instances when your vehicle goes from good to bad, are you prepared to deal with any potential emergencies? Don't think an accident or breakdown won't happen to you. Rather than take a chance, equip yourself with a car emergency kit.
This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.  Update (1150ET): Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the Director of the Center for the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), spoke on behalf of the CDC. During the press conference, she said that the US had identified 110 people who are under observation and being tested […]
Ever since this coronavirus outbreak first began, the mainstream media has been feeding us fake news over and over again.  Initially, we were repeatedly told that there was very little to be concerned about because it was very unlikely that human to human transmission was happening.  But now we know that this virus spreads very, very easily between people. 
if you are near the ocean and know lobsterman or commercial fisherman ask for their expired signal equipment, they have to replace every so often and I am sure they would be more than happy to give you or ask for a small donation for that stuff.. its worth its weight in gold if you kayak or hike. My husband gives me all his exspired stuff and I hope I never use them. BUT, I have them in case I need it.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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