The thing I find pretty sad about a lot of these prep sites is the thought that society falls apart once something like this happens, in my experience of natural disasters, these times are when humanity is at its best and everyone helps thier neighbours. Good people become better people. But then I live in Australia, and have never been to America.
Your kit should be easily accessible at a moment’s notice. This means choosing a storage space in the most frequented areas of your house. Typically, the kitchen, living room, or mudroom closets are great options. Many people store kits in their garage as well, but in the event of an unpredicted flood, your kit can wind up waterlogged before you know it.

We found this awesome list of survival medical supplies over at Doom and Bloom, and we have to give credit where credit is due, this is one of the most inclusive and exhaustive lists of medical supplies one would need for most any survival situation. In fact, it’s more likely than not if you were to stockpile all of these items, you would be the new-age Dr. Quin Medicine Woman when SHTF.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
Eventually everything will be gone if you wait long enough, but if you look at actual events such as a major hurricane here in the USA, the Greece financial meltdown, the collapse of USSR, the war in Syria, the situation in Venezuela, or any poor country that has been hit by a major disaster you’ll quickly see a pattern of items that disappear at the very beginning of a panic buying rush.
I look forward to my delivery every month. I used to belong to another monthly box that had different themes every month. I found so much of their stuff to be worthless. I mean why would I want/need a cigar. I find the items in these boxes fun and interesting. Many items I have seen on the website and considered buying. I only wish there was a way to suggest different items. - Robert Nash
Freshwater may get contaminated. If it is, it requires purifying or desalinating water to satisfy hydration needs. Humans can survive only a few days without fresh water. When SHTF, your water tap will dry up fast. You need to find a new solution. There is a variety of water filtration gear available online that you can reuse hundreds or even thousands of times. It is highly recommended that your survival kit includes several backups.
Radio transceiver, standard VHF marine when operating near inland shore, 121.5 MHz AM VHF guard channel capable aircraft band transceiver to contact rescuers and high overflying commercial and military aircraft visible by contrails, an optional amateur radio if a licensed radio amateur, (see Ham Radio) or an AM/FM/Weather/Shortwave radio receiver to receive precise time for celestial navigation as well as weather information

Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case.

The Deluxe Car Emergency Kit from GetReadyNow comes in a clear, heavy-duty dry bag to keep supplies from getting wet and to allow for easy visibility. It fits conveniently under the seat and contains an LED headlamp with batteries, 4 Millennium food bars, 8 water pouches, LED glow sticks, waste disposal bags, Mylar blankets, ponchos, a 46-piece first aid kit, and much more!
This survival kit is packed with the essential supplies so that you will need to survive an emergency for up to 72 hours. It is built to last and all of the gear is packed nicely in a backpack with comfortable carry straps. The kit contains; food, water, emergency radio, medical and hygiene supplies, survival tools, supplies for warmth and shelter and more.
Widely regarded as “the world’s best 72-hour Survival Kit,” this system features an external shell made of 600-Denier Tarpaulin material, a Sawyer Water Filtration system, a Mylar Thermal survival tent, a 20-piece first aid kit, 100 feet of paracord, lightweight goggles, a survival knife, and much more! If you don’t ever want to buy another survival kit again, grab this one now.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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