Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.
Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.

Selecting the right kit requires an understanding of the situations you’re most likely to need it for. A helpful exercise can be to create a list of 10 items you’d absolutely need in the event of a natural disaster or extended period without power and access to food and water. Then make a list of another 20 to 3o supplies you’d also like to have handy in this situation. This will give you a great baseline to help you narrow down your options.
If possible, each teen and adult should put their own multi-purpose tool, poncho, flashlight with extra batteries, first aid kit and fishing gear in their own backpack or bug out bag. While the chances of such a disastrous event may seem like science fiction, there are many conditions and situations that suggest the distinct potential for the worst case scenario.

Knives & Sharpening tools are worth mentioning on their own. Carbon steel knives are better than stainless. Sharpening stones are a must. Possibly the best all around knife you could ever buy is a high carbon steel Mora knife ($10 on Amazon with free shipping). The material is harder than stainless steel and they have a Scandinavian grind that makes them extremely sharp, durable, and even easier to resharpen than most knives.
Well said, Dale. We have been getting good info from you for several years, and I thank you. I have a great deal of survival food and I cook with mine every day. I cannot see the sense in waiting twenty-five years to find out whether or not the food is still good, and whether or not we like it. When we open a new pack, we get another to replace it. If we don’t like the content, we can always find someone in need. You and Lisa have inspired several friends and family members to pay closer attention to current events and prepare for what we hope will never happen. Thanks, Rob

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Your kit should be easily accessible at a moment’s notice. This means choosing a storage space in the most frequented areas of your house. Typically, the kitchen, living room, or mudroom closets are great options. Many people store kits in their garage as well, but in the event of an unpredicted flood, your kit can wind up waterlogged before you know it.
Some of you might be thinking, “I’m a prepper, I won’t have to scavenge for supplies. I already have everything I need.” Maybe, maybe not. Even if you’ve been prepping for years, it’s still possible you forgot a few things. But even if you didn’t forget anything, you could still end up in a situation where you need something you never thought you’d need.
Paracord is the cord that keeps parachutists safely attached to their parachutes when jumping. It is also what individuals use for rock climbing. It’s super strong and durable. However, a rope is a good replacement in emergency situations because paracord can be used for shelter building, rescue, perimeter security, traversing structures and much more.
I also never see any type of plant seeds listed in case of severe problems that last longer than a few months. There are no provisions for growing your own food. Bleach is fine for producing drinkable water but also Iodine Tablets. Lastly as the Sgt has said at times it you may have to leave home. But if you can stay home and learn who your neighbors are you will probably be safer.
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