In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
What happens when a disaster hits while you are on the road? Survival Supply has you covered in this area, as well. For preparing your any type of auto disaster, from a breakdown to a whiteout, go with a thorough roadside kit from our store. Each of our auto emergency kits has just the right supplies for handling standard car problems, increasing your visibility in the dark, and signaling for help.
Food supplies in a bug-out vehicle include hundreds of pounds of wheat, rice, and beans, and enough honey, powdered milk, canned goods, bottled fruit, vitamins, dehydrated fruits and vegetables, salt, pepper, spices, and oil for several months. In addition, the kits often contain high-calorie energy bars, a cooking kit, utensils, liquid soap, and towels. The water supplies may include bottled water, filtering kit, bottles, collapsible water containers, and chlorine bleach for water purification. Food preparation and washing equipment may include items such as a grain grinder, a bread mixer, a strainer, a manual can opener, a steam canner with canning jars and O-rings, cutlery, knives, an electric 12-volt cooler icebox, kerosene lamps and heaters, kerosene or propane stoves, extra fuel, a clothes wringer, a foot-operated treadle sewing machine, and an electric hot plate (which would require an inverter to operate off a car battery).

There are two subjects that the mainstream media seems specifically determined to avoid discussing these days when it comes to the economy – the first is the problem of falling global demand for goods and services; they absolutely refuse to acknowledge the fact that demand is going stagnant and will conjure all kinds of rationalizations to distract from the issue. The other subject is the debt bubble, the corporate debt bubble in particular.

What if you have to take in a pregnant woman or a parent with a small child? You may have to go looking for baby formula. What if your mother’s prescription medications are lost or destroyed? You may have to go looking for replacement meds. What if a crucial piece of gear is damaged? What if you need parts for your shelter or vehicle? These are just a few possibilities off the top of my head. There are dozens of situations you won’t think of until you’re in them.


Ryan: Something I’ve always put at the top of my list is boots.  Boots that can handle some water and keep my feet dry.  Travel over any distance can be quickly go from back to horrible/impossible with damage to our feet.  In my opinion, I’ll spend a bit more for good quality and durability.  With that said, I’ve found Danner and then Vasque to be my preference.
It is interesting how difficult it is to stop people from shopping from your stockpile, before shtf. Every time I leave town for a few days, I loose most of my stored stuff. 1. Put up security lights. 2. Put up a security camera. Stored to a backup drive. 3. Changed locks, added more bolts. Backup drive got stolen, and system was erased. Next I might get cameras to watch the cameras. Ouch. Or perhaps just send events to my phone.
if you are near the ocean and know lobsterman or commercial fisherman ask for their expired signal equipment, they have to replace every so often and I am sure they would be more than happy to give you or ask for a small donation for that stuff.. its worth its weight in gold if you kayak or hike. My husband gives me all his exspired stuff and I hope I never use them. BUT, I have them in case I need it.
make a map of areas covered and items for future use when in need. the list and map can be passed to others in your group that would save time vertically all office buildings and factories must have emer. lighting to allow exit when the power fails or fire blocks vision these have rechargeable batteries. while these are not the best type they will provide lighting and are easily recharged. circuit boards that are in them will provide a way to recharge the batteries. also they have candy machines that could be emptied quickly things like toilet paper is usual stored in adequate supplies. some places provide sanitary supplies for women hilos could provide batteries as well. places large enough to service their cars and trucks would have oil and fuel. this is where the list will come in handy so others can find it easily.
When to use a bug out bag. This is a tricky question - there is no definite answer. If some disaster occurs and there is a mandatory evacuation, obviously a pack would be good to have. However, voluntary evacuations are obviously up to you. If it becomes impossible to live in your home due to events like gas leaks, fires, nuclear disaster, flooding, etc.; you’ll want a bug out bag. However, remember that voluntary evacuations should be one of your last resorts. Leaving your home forces you to leave behind shelter, warmth, protection and possibly food.
Paracord is the cord that keeps parachutists safely attached to their parachutes when jumping. It is also what individuals use for rock climbing. It’s super strong and durable. However, a rope is a good replacement in emergency situations because paracord can be used for shelter building, rescue, perimeter security, traversing structures and much more.
Walkie Talkies are great but remember to buy rechargeable batteries and a solar battery charger. Print out or copy any important documents you may need (especially ones online) now instead of later. Build any buildings you need ,such as a smoke house or root cellar, now instead of later. Stock up on some motor oil, it can be used to lubricate and protect metal items and tools.
Will have to totally disagree on this one. Cleaning up after using a menstrual cup is like birthing a kitten…speaking from personal experience. When it comes to my monthly when SHTF, I would much rather have a cleaner process overall. You are already having to dispose of blood/bloody items, why not just make it a more pleasurable experience. Also, water is probably going to be a precious commodity…don’t want to waste it washing out pads. Just IMHO.
The undisputed experts when it comes to key survival gear? The rangers who save hikers who go astray. Jeff Webb, a search-and-rescue ranger at Yosemite National Park, has worked on more than 200 rescue missions. He's also seen action in Big Bend, Yellowstone, Canyonlands, Joshua Tree, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. With his advice, our editors put together this ultimate survival kit for hikers.

Thank you for re-posting this list! It is very very comprehensive! I read through the comments and also added your reader’s additions to it for my own list! One thing I would add is a good drying rack for herbal processing! A whole lot of what you have on the list has herbal alternatives that are just as effective and without some of the side effects! I want to also add – don’t forget to look for good books on how to use the medicinal herbs you find and how to harvest them properly! My household forages and wildcrafts many herbs and spices all season long. Most of the herbs we gather are processed into tinctures, salves, and syrups. Some we hang dry to dehydrate, then store in sealed glass mason jars in a large cabinet designed to keep out light just for our herbs! We have now taken to gathering good old dollar tree spices and things like that every time we go to town to grocery shop! Pepper, salt, and garlic powder being among the chief of these.
All our Car Emergency Kits contains everything you need in case of an emergency. We have the most popular AAA approved emergency kits. Here is short list of car emergency kits we are offering to our customers: winter car emergency kits, vehicle emergency kits, emergency road assistance kits, road traveler kit, Severe Weather Winter Travel Kit AAA-approved , Piece Severe Weather Winter Travel Kit AAA-approved, Roadside Emergency Kit, Economy Auto Emergency Kit, Ready Tube Personal Evacuation Kit with 72 hours water and food for one person!, Urban Road Warrior, auto first aid kits for any unexpected medical emergency.
The Army released water on top of it flash flooding. OH MY GOSH, water was rushing up to the back of our property and we though we were going to have to leave our homes. Luckly, I had bug out bags ready. We didn’t really have anywhere to go other than further up the hill and set in our vehicle, but that was ok because we would have food with us. (With the flooding everywhere we could not get to anyone else’s property that we know.)

Every survival kit and emergency preparedness plan should include emergency blankets and lights. Mylar blankets effectively reflect body heat, and can keep you warm throughout a cold night. Their extreme lightweight and compact size make them an ideal part of a survival kit. To ensure you have adequate light in the event of a power failure, chemical snap lights are a convenient solution that doesn’t rely on batteries. Many snap lights last for 12 hours or more, and have a five year shelf life, so you know they’ll be there for you when you need them.
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