Lightweight survival kits are generally seen as a backup means of survival; however, these can kits can be extensive, and have come to include tools that are generally found in larger kits as survival technology advances. Some examples of these tools are high power flashlights, rapid use saws, signal devices such as mini signal mirrors, and water purification methods.
Widely regarded as “the world’s best 72-hour Survival Kit,” this system features an external shell made of 600-Denier Tarpaulin material, a Sawyer Water Filtration system, a Mylar Thermal survival tent, a 20-piece first aid kit, 100 feet of paracord, lightweight goggles, a survival knife, and much more! If you don’t ever want to buy another survival kit again, grab this one now.

A very good article that hit on the essential categories without too much focus on the product advertising angle. While I agree with all twelve, my #13 would include items such as hatchets and machetes. There are simply too many instances where a fixed blade knife, regardless of its size, is not an effective survival tool. My personal preference tends toward the machete because it works so well on clearing brush. Both are (or can be) effective defensive weapons as well, if you know how to use them.

Earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes can cause you to leave your home or even be trapped there. Roads could be blocked due to fallen trees, power lines, or even damaged earth from the natural disaster. Rescue crews can not be in all places at once. You may have to wait it out for quite a while before its over. You won't be able to go to the store or to the corner market.
We found this awesome list of survival medical supplies over at Doom and Bloom, and we have to give credit where credit is due, this is one of the most inclusive and exhaustive lists of medical supplies one would need for most any survival situation. In fact, it’s more likely than not if you were to stockpile all of these items, you would be the new-age Dr. Quin Medicine Woman when SHTF.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
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