There are two subjects that the mainstream media seems specifically determined to avoid discussing these days when it comes to the economy – the first is the problem of falling global demand for goods and services; they absolutely refuse to acknowledge the fact that demand is going stagnant and will conjure all kinds of rationalizations to distract from the issue. The other subject is the debt bubble, the corporate debt bubble in particular.
Salt is a precious and portable commodity. Salt has long been a cornerstone of economies throughout history. Greek slave traders often bartered salt for slaves, giving rise to the expression that someone was “not worth his salt.” Roman legionnaires were paid with salt—salarium, the Latin origin of the word “salary.” It is a vital nutrient and is used to preserve meat. At less than $.40 a pound salt makes a great barter item to stock up on, especially if it goes back to its pre-modern prices.
It is interesting how difficult it is to stop people from shopping from your stockpile, before shtf. Every time I leave town for a few days, I loose most of my stored stuff. 1. Put up security lights. 2. Put up a security camera. Stored to a backup drive. 3. Changed locks, added more bolts. Backup drive got stolen, and system was erased. Next I might get cameras to watch the cameras. Ouch. Or perhaps just send events to my phone.
Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.
Thats extremely naive thinking. Starve someone for a few days then see what theyd do for a can of beans. People riot after sports events for no reason, you think a stranger wouldnt kill you to feed their kids? Sure, people might band together for the 1st week, but once food and water start running out, its everyone for themselves. We’re not talking about a flood/tornado/hurricane situation here. Think WORST CASE SCENARIO.
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This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge.  Update (1150ET): Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the Director of the Center for the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), spoke on behalf of the CDC. During the press conference, she said that the US had identified 110 people who are under observation and being tested […]
First time customer and first time unboxing these widely advertised shtf boxes. Im very impressed with the quality and contents of my first shtf box. This is an instant addiction, cant wait for the March 19 box too arrive. I was blown away by the Uniden Scout Radios and the waterproof backpack. No im not an employee, im a dedicated customer at this point. Great product!!!!
Survival kits, in a variety of sizes, contain supplies and tools to provide a survivor with basic shelter against the elements, help him or her to keep warm, meet basic health and first aid needs, provide food and water, signal to rescuers, and assist in finding the way back to help. Supplies in a survival kit normally contain a knife (often a Swiss army knife or a multi-tool), matches, tinder, first aid kit, bandana, fish hooks, sewing kit, and a flashlight.
On said database would be everything you can think of…food stores, sporting goods stores, pharmacies, hospitals, clothing stores, truck stops, jewelry stores (could barter with said items), banks (gold/silver/cash for later), even solar farms, ranches, farms, even entertainment stores (TV’s, DVDS, board games, computers; some would be useful for security needs, and others just for entertainment, of coarse you would have to think about how to make electricity too)…etc… The main question to ask your self is, even if the cars do not stop right away, the gas will within a year or two (if not less). If your mode of operation for the rest of your life is going to be horses, bike, or walking, what things do you need to survive or would it be nice to have near you. Wait for a few months for everything to die down, then reference your database and go get those things…Also the database would include how to guides for almost everything your could think of…
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